On Saturday, September 26th, 2015 we were again at the commemoration Orange Hotel in Scheveningen. In 2010 we were also present at this commemoration. Since 1946, the annual commemoration is held on the last Saturday of September or the first Saturday of October. During the commemoration a memorial speech pronounced by a prominent Dutchman. This year it was prof.mr. G.J.M. Corstens, former president of the Supreme Court. And pays tribute to the prisoners of the Oranje Hotel during a Silent Walk Along Doodencel 601.

The memorial service is annually attended by some 400 people, including representatives of the States General, the Government, the city of The Hague, the province of Zuid-Holland and many organizations of former gevangenen.Tijdens the first commemoration were and the Doodencel inaugurated the Poortje; in 1950 the memorial plaque on the Stevinstraat was unveiled by Queen Juliana. The Orange Hotel was nicknamed the prison in Scheveningen during World War II. From 1919 to 1940 served the Cell Barracks in Scheveningen prison and remand for petty criminals. After the German invasion of May 10, 1940 German prisoner of war were imprisoned. After the capitulation of the Netherlands the Germans took over the prison. The first prisoners were in all probability Engelandvaarders, but soon the Oranje Hotel was mainly used to imprison people and resistance to interrogation. The first group of resistance fighters who were imprisoned by the end of 1940, were members of the Geuzen Group. Then came on April 2, 1941 a large number of members of the Stijkelgroep and from the beginning of June 1941 an even larger number of communists and many other political prisoners. The Orange Hotel nickname is mentioned on March 8, 1941 in the illegal newspaper Fri Netherlands. From this initial period also dates the famous poem: "In this prison is no riffraff, but Dutch glory golly." Many prisoners were tortured during interrogations by the Security Service and members of the Hague municipal police, because they were so difficult to speak to. There are several people tortured to death or killed in the Orange Hotel, as Pieter Philip van den Berg (communist) on August 29, 1940, Sjaak Boezeman (The Beggars) on January 9, 1941 and Herman Holstege (communist) on 2 September 1941 have total during the occupation some 25,000 people detained in the Orange Hotel. They were arrested by the Germans for various acts of resistance or Deutschfeindlichkeit, listening to Radio Oranje to perpetrate attacks against Germans. After treatment of their case by the Nazis, some were released but thousands were condemned to long stays in the German camps or workhouses. 215 death row inmates have been transferred from the Orange Hotel in fusillering by truck to the Waalsdorpervlakte.

In May 1945 the prison came in Dutch hands and was EP Weber the new commander of the prison. Many NSB, including Anton Mussert and other Dutch who were suspected of war crimes, were imprisoned in 1945 in Scheveningen. Ernst Knorr came back here, not now as interrogator but as a prisoner.

List of prisoners

Doodencel 601

A number of cells in the central corridor of the Orange Hotel, the D-hall, was used as kill cells. Here condemned men waited for the order to walk through the gate to the truck that would take them to the Waalsdorpervlakte. In their last hours the prisoners were allowed to have contact with each other, talk, pray, cry, sing. In some cases, they still could write a letter. One of the dead cells, Doodencel 601, is preserved in its original state. A portrait of Queen Wilhelmina now hangs above the door. The walls show the original inscriptions of the prisoners to hope, fear and longing for home were made. Doodencel 601 forms the core of the Monument Orange Hotel. During the annual commemoration lay hundreds of flowers at Doodencel 601.

The Gate

At the Van Alkemade Laan is located next to a large gate, a small gate in the outer wall. By this small port, the condemned men were led out to be executed on the Waalsdorpervlakte.



Next door is a plaque placed in 1949 in memory of all who were carried away for the Waalsdorpervlakte. The inscription on the plaque of former prisoner, professor and author Anthony Donkersloot and reads:


1940 - 1945
REMEMBER THEIR LAST PASSAGE THROUGH THIS LOW GATE, THEIR LIFE FOR FREEDOM AND LAW GIVEN. PUT THEIR FIGHT RESULT

 


Death Books and Names

Death Books are four bands with photos and biographies of 734 members of the resistance who died during or after their stay at the Orange Hotel. Death Books are compiled shortly after the war based on information about former prisoners of the Oranje Hotel which was then collected. The data are far from complete, but the books are an impressive monument to the fallen.


During the annual commemoration of the books in Doodencel 601 are laid. They are in the custody of the National Archives and consult digital. In addition to the Death Books in 1946 -1947 the Commemorative Book of the Orange Hotel compiled by Major EP Weber. This is the life and personal history - or only the name in many cases - described prisoners.

Detailed lists of prisoners of the Orange Hotel are not available. Shortly before the end of the war the archives of the prison have been largely destroyed by the Germans.

List of the Foundation Orange Hotel is a digital tribute to former prisoners who are listed with a brief biography and, if available, photos or documents. The information is usually provided by private individuals to the Foundation and are not checked for historical accuracy. In addition, the list contains additional information about prisoners listed in the Commemorative Book of the Dead Books.



Foundation Orange hotel

HMonument Oranje Hotel consisting of Doodencel 601, the Gate, the plaque "They were of one accord" and Death Books, owned since 1946 by the Foundation Orange Hotel. The Foundation Orange Hotel also organizes the annual commemoration. Monument Oranje Hotel is nearly 70 years shut up in the Scheveningen prison, but now the Cell Barracks no longer in use, the Foundation Orange Hotel since 2012 to the renovation and opening of the Monument. To this end, in collaboration with the Government Buildings Agency and the Ministry of Security and Justice developed a design for which funding is currently being sought. Since the end of 2013 once per month opportunity given to the public to visit Doodencel 601.

Photo Gallery of prisoners in the 'Orange Hotel'

The room was filled with former detainees, relatives and interested parties.
Theatre The Apple reads from 'Orange Hotel' Eduard Veterman, former resistance fighter and former prisoner. About his stay at the Orange Hotel, he wrote the piece 'Orange Hotel' which premiered on November 19, 1945. Theatre The Apple reads the third scene of the play: "A number of men locked in a cramped cell, in fear of the interrogation, torture and the verdict. They try to smuggle inside information about the outside world. They know that the Allies advancing, but time is running out ...
Tessel Hersbach, violinist, plays the title music from the film Schindler's List, John Williams, accompanied by the Royal Police Band Haaglanden.
Then, the silent procession begins along Doodencel 601.
A number of cells in the central corridor of the Orange Hotel, the D-hall, was used as "death row". Here condemned men waited for the order to the Poortje walking to the truck that would take them to the Waalsdorpervlakte. In their last hours the prisoners were allowed to have contact with each other, talk, pray, cry, sing. In some cases, they still could write a letter.
One of the dead cells, Doodencel 601, is preserved in its original state. A portrait of Queen Wilhelmina now hangs above the door. The walls show the original inscriptions of the prisoners to hope, fear and longing for home were made. Doodencel 601 forms the core of the annual commemoration.

 

After the ceremony we walked to the canteen for a cup of coffee and a sandwich. But it still remains a bit creepy when you see around walls with barbed wire. We were finally in the area of the prison in Scheveningen.