A walk along the escape route Operation Pegasus

On Saturday, April 4, 2009, we had the annual meeting of the Friends of the Airborne Museum in hotel restaurant Nol in 't Bos, located in the beautiful surroundings of Renkum and Wageningen. Afther the meeting we walked part of the route used during the evacuation operation Pegasus.

Of the approximately 8,000 casualties of the British 1st Airborne Division (including the glider pilots and the Polish Brigade) not all were killed during the battle or taken prisoner by the Germans: quite a number of men evaded capture. At least 300 of these men managed to return to the Allied lines eventually, often with help from the Dutch resistance. One such attempt to reach friendly grounds was operation 'Pegasus I' on the night of 22 October 1944, were Major Allison Digby Tatham-Warter led 138 men safely across the Lower Rhine. The news of this successful escape soon reached the Germans, who reacted by strengthening their patrol on the river bank. As a result of this 'Pegasus II' on 18 November 1944 failed with only 7 men returning safely. Colonel Graeme Warrack, the Division's chief medical officer, who had arranged the evacuation of the British wounded during the battle of Arnhem, was one of those persons who didn't make it to the Allied lines that time. For him and many others more time of hiding and travelling would follow. Warrack returned safely on 6 February 1945, almost 5 months after the beginning of Market Garden.

 
The author Cees Hazelhoek, author of the book entitled Get'em Out was also present at the walk. This book is about the escape operation. There were two: Pegasus I and Pegasus II. The second has, unfortunately, failed. In this hotel restaurant on the border of Wageningen and Renkum we had the annual meeting of the VVAM and began our rout following operation Pegasus.
The author Cees Hazelhoek, author of the book entitled Get'em Out was also present at the walk. This book is about the escape operation. There were two: Pegasus I and Pegasus II. The second has, unfortunately, failed.
 
In this hotel restaurant on the border of Wageningen and Renkum we had the annual meeting of the VVAM and began our rout following operation Pegasus.
On the terrace of the hotel restaurant Nol in 't Forest, I saw this beautiful outdoor chess. Theme of this day was the greatest escape operation from the Second World War, Operation Pegasus. Therefore on our meeting point these figures were displayed, showing how British military men were changing closes after a long period of hiding or wander.
On the terrace of the hotel restaurant Nol in 't Forest, I saw this beautiful outdoor chess
 
Theme of this day was the greatest escape operation from the Second World War, Operation Pegasus. Therefore on our meeting point these figures were displayed, showing how British military men were changing closes after a long period of hiding.
The escape route was through the woods of Renkum in the direction of the river Rhine.
The escape route was through the woods of Renkum in the direction of the river Rhine.
 
We walk the route followed during Operation Pegasus.
We follow the escape route of the survivors used during Operation Pegasus. Cees Haverhoek, author of the book 'Get 'em Out, the story of Pegasus I and II', gives an explanation.

Here the soldiers before they dress as part of Operation Pegasus will cross the Rhine. They do this in the barn in the photo left is displayed.
This barn was the last stop before the floodplains of the River Rhine were achieved. Here the soldiers before they dress as part of Operation Pegasus will cross the Rhine. They do this in the barn in the photo left is displayed.
The floodplains of the River Rhine are achieved. This was the most dangerous part, because this open area was under the eye of German patrols before the river was reached. Already a few days, the Americans on the other side gave fierce artillery fire, so the attention of the Germans was derived. Also American patrols infiltrated this area.