On Saturday, September 15, 2012 I took part again in a great battlefield tour of the Friends of the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek in the context of the commemoration of the Battle of Arnhem in September 1944 with the subject 'Traces of the Battle of Arnhem'. This battlefield tour went through Arnhem and Oosterbeek.

The tour began at 09.30 pm from the Talsma Avenue next to the restaurant Kleyn Hartensteyn in Oosterbeek. The bus ride was interspersed with short walks. Both the bus and at various places in the area gave guides explain the events in September 1944 and showed us the traces of those fights that after 68 years still to be seen. We used the lunch restaurant Schoonoord in Oosterbeek, on the site of the former hotel Schoonoord, one of the hospitals during the battle. At 17.00 pm we were back in Oosterbeek.

The battlefield tour was led by Wybo Boersma, former director of the Airborne Museum and guide of the International Guild of Battlefield Guides, assisted by guides from the Friends of the Airborne Museum. We then followed the march routes of the parachute battalions to the Rhine bridge at Arnhem and surroundings, the St. Elisabeth Hospital and the Lombok district. Then we ended the siege of the Airborne troops around the headquarters in Hartenstein and the fighting around the Reformed church in Oosterbeek-Low. In conclusion, we visited the Airborne Cemetery in Oosterbeek.

 
On the terrace of restaurant Schoonoord in Oosterbeek I found this British paratroopers that morning from a Dakota jumped.
On the terrace of restaurant Schoonoord in Oosterbeek I found this British paratroopers that morning from a Dakota jumped.
On the terrace of restaurant Schoonoord in Oosterbeek I found this British paratroopers that morning from a Dakota jumped.
 
We gebruikten de lunch in restaurant Schoonoord. Tijdens de slag om Arnhem - september 1944 - werd het gebouw door de 1e Engelse Airborne divisie als noodhospitaal ingericht. Meer dan 500 gewonden werden hier binnengebracht en zo goed als mogelijk verzorgd. Op de kamers die eerder als gastvrij vakantieverblijf dienden,werd nu gevochten voor levens. Door de felle strijd die hier woedde, raakte het gebouw zwaar beschadigd. Toch werd het niet afgebroken. Na 1945 werd er gebouwd en hersteld. De oude glorie kreeg Schoonoord daarmee niet terug, maar haar indrukwekkend verleden blijft tot de dag van vandaag overeind.
 
We used the lunch at restaurant Schoonoord. During the battle of Arnhem - September 1944 - the building was used by the 1st British Airborne Division as an emergency hospital. More than 500 wounded were brought here and as good as it looked. In the rooms previously served as hospitable holiday, was now fighting for life. Because of the fierce battle that raged here, the building fell heavily damaged. Yet it was not broken. After 1945 there was built and repaired. The old glory was Schoonoord thus not returned, but its impressive past remains to this day intact.
 
At the entrance of restaurant Schoonoord I saw this picture collage

At the entrance of restaurant Schoonoord I saw this picture collage

 

Onze gids Wybo Boersma, voormalig directeur van het Airborne Museum en lid van de Guild of Battlefield Guides.
Our guide Wybo Boersma, former director of the Airborne Museum and member of the Guild of Battlefield Guides.
Onze gids Wybo Boersma, voormalig directeur van het Airborne Museum en lid van de Guild of Battlefield Guides.
 
The Battle of Arnhem was part of a much larger operation codenamed Market Garden had. During this operation had three airborne divisions from the Belgian border at Lommel to Arnhem bridges over the various waterways conquer, and the 30th Corps to Central Netherlands could advance. At Arnhem failed to conquer the bridge over the Rhine. During this tour of Arnhem and Oosterbeek we visited the landing and dropping fields of the 1st British Airborne Division.
 
Dropping zone X to Wolfheze, south of the railway Arnhem-Ede. Here landed the 1st Parachute Brigade consisting of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Parachute Battalion.

Dropping zone X to Wolfheze, south of the railway Arnhem-Ede. Here landed the 1st Parachute Brigade consisting of the 1st, 2nd and 3rd Parachute Battalion.

 
Ginkel Heath, east of Ede. This was dropping zone Y, where on September 18, 1944 the 4th Parachute Brigade and units landed on Sunday not landed. The 4th Parachute Brigade consisted of the 10th, 11th and 156th Parachute Battalion.
Ginkel Heath, east of Ede. This was dropping zone Y, where on September 18, 1944 the 4th Parachute Brigade and units landed on Sunday not landed. The 4th Parachute Brigade consisted of the 10th, 11th and 156th Parachute Battalion.
Ginkel Heath when we were on September 15, 2012 and the following shots of gliders landed and German defense on 18 September 1944.

Ginkel Heath when we were on September 15, 2012 and the following shots of gliders landed and German defense on 18 September 1944.

Landed paratroopers put their equipment on a cart that was chartered by citizens.
Landed paratroopers put their equipment on a cart that was chartered by citizens.
Along the way, the British had the first German prisoner of war, including Irene Reimann. She was Luftwaffe Nachrichtenhelferin and the only female prisoner at Arnhem.
Along the way, the British had the first German prisoner of war, including Irene Reimann. She was Luftwaffe Nachrichtenhelferin and the only female prisoner at Arnhem.
Along the way, the British had the first German prisoner of war, including Irene Reimann. She was Luftwaffe Nachrichtenhelferin and the only female prisoner at Arnhem.

Along the way, the British had the first German prisoner of war, including Irene Reimann. She was Luftwaffe Nachrichtenhelferin and the only female prisoner at Arnhem.

Along the way, the British had the first German prisoner of war, including Irene Reimann. She was Luftwaffe Nachrichtenhelferin and the only female prisoner at Arnhem.

 

Explenation at the diver Wolfheze. The diver was a narrow stone tunnel under the railway line from Arnhem to Wolfheze. Here were men of the 1st Airborne in an ambush by the SS.

 

Onderlangs at Arnhem

Onderlangs at Arnhem

 

We walk in the neighborhood Lombok, located behind the St. Elisabeth Hospital (on the right)

We walk in the neighborhood Lombok, located behind the St. Elisabeth Hospital (on the right)

 

In the district of Lombok Wybo Boersma tells us what happened here. During the Battle of Arnhem became Major General Robert Urquhart cut off from his own troops. He was forced into hiding in the attic of Zwarteweg 14 in anticipation of what was to come. This event had a major impact on the further course of the battle. The British were from landing fields along three routes to the Rhine bridge erection. A convoy of jeeps Reconnaissance Squadron was the first to arrive there. This unit stranded soon. Urquhart wanted Lathbury of the 1st Parachute Brigade reason to know that the 2nd Parachute Battalion led by John Frost had to make haste to reach the bridge. Frost would take the southern route through the lower village of Oosterbeek and Onderlangs. Behind Frost followed the headquarters of Lathbury. Then there Urquhart arrived, the brigade commander himself but drove off to the 3rd Parachute Battalion from Fitch. This followed the central route to the Rhine bridge, through the Utrechtseweg. All this back and forth utensils was caused by bad connections worked. Lathbury and Urquhart met up at Fitch. Because after fighting broke out in the column with the Germans, and the way back to the rear for Urquhart was cut off, it was decided that the generals in the 3rd Parachute Battalion would remain, and the advance to Arnhem with them would follow. The next day - Monday, 18 September - suggested Lathbury however still for Urquhart to return to his division headquarters. They ran away, but in the wrong direction. They walked the Germans in Lombok meeting. Lathbury was wounded, and hid in a house, while Urquhart in another house hid. The next day was the division commander appalled by other British units, and returned to his headquarters.

In the district of Lombok Wybo Boersma tells us what happened here. During the Battle of Arnhem became Major General Robert Urquhart cut off from his own troops. He was forced into hiding in the attic of Zwarteweg 14 in anticipation of what was to come. This event had a major impact on the further course of the battle. The British were from landing fields along three routes to the Rhine bridge erection. A convoy of jeeps Reconnaissance Squadron was the first to arrive there. This unit stranded soon. Urquhart wanted Lathbury of the 1st Parachute Brigade reason to know that the 2nd Parachute Battalion led by John Frost had to make haste to reach the bridge. Frost would take the southern route through the lower village of Oosterbeek and Onderlangs. Behind Frost followed the headquarters of Lathbury. Then there Urquhart arrived, the brigade commander himself but drove off to the 3rd Parachute Battalion from Fitch. This followed the central route to the Rhine bridge, through the Utrechtseweg. All this back and forth utensils was caused by bad connections worked. Lathbury and Urquhart met up at Fitch. Because after fighting broke out in the column with the Germans, and the way back to the rear for Urquhart was cut off, it was decided that the generals in the 3rd Parachute Battalion would remain, and the advance to Arnhem with them would follow. The next day - Monday, 18 September - suggested Lathbury however still for Urquhart to return to his division headquarters. They ran away, but in the wrong direction. They walked the Germans in Lombok meeting. Lathbury was wounded, and hid in a house, while Urquhart in another house hid. The next day was the division commander appalled by other British units, and returned to his headquarters.

 

General Urquhart in the house where he was hiding.

General Urquhart in the house where he was hiding.

 

Urquhart house on Zwarteweg in Arnhem, located in the district of Lombok.

 

Front of house Urquhart. State now apparently empty (good idea for a museum?)

 

By this firebreak General Urquhart ran to the house where he was hiding.

By this firebreak General Urquhart ran to the house where he was hiding.

 

The back of the house Urquhart

The back of the house Urquhart

 

Lieutenant Cleminson 60 years later in the attic Zwarteweg 14 in Arnhem, where he hid himself with General Urquhart.

Lieutenant Cleminson 60 years later in the attic Zwarteweg 14 in Arnhem, where he hid himself with General Urquhart.

Lieutenant Cleminson 60 years later in the attic Zwarteweg 14 in Arnhem, where he hid himself with General Urquhart.

 

We listen to the remarkable story of a general who hid in an attic for the enemy.
 

 

 
The tour took us to the bridge where it was all about. The John Frost Bridge over the Rhine at Arnhem. This bridge was thus a 'bridge too far'. We visited the Jacob Groenewoud plantsoen at the foot of the bridge.
 
Below: soon the Germans could again make use of the Rhine Bridge Arnhem when the British were driven there once.
 
 

Currently, the St. Elisabeth Hospital peaceful sight. Very different was that after the war in September 1944, see picture below.

 

We visited the Dutch Reformed Church in Oosterbeek-Low. This church was finally the last defensive position of the British and was the southern edge of the perimeter. Around this church gathered Major Lonsdale the last remnants of the various British battalions and held in the church 'pep talk'. From there, the soldiers owere ecacuated in darkness to the now liberated south of the Netherlands at the night of 25 to 26 September 1944 . They had to do this in boats cross the Rhine. This operation was called Berlin.
 
De N.H. kerk in Oosterbeek-Laag as it looked like before the war.

De N.H. kerk in Oosterbeek-Laag as it looked like before the war.

This door with 'peptalk' was used by Major Lonsdale during shooting of the film "Theirs is the Glory", shortly after the war. The door was in the Reformed church and was later transferred to the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek.

This door with 'peptalk' was used by Major Lonsdale during shooting of the film "Theirs is the Glory", shortly after the war. The door was in the Reformed church and was later transferred to the Airborne Museum in Oosterbeek.

The interior of the church after the battle.

The interior of the church after the battle.

The ruined Reformed Church at Oosterbeek-Low after the war.

The ruined Reformed Church at Oosterbeek-Low after the war.

 
At the end of the battlefield tour "Traces of the Battle of Arnhem" we visited the Airborne Cemetery at Oosterbeek.